the new Vintage Speed exhaust reminds me with of an old skool ‘zoom tube’ exhaust

Vintage Speed VW Split screen rear end transformation

With the weather looking fair to good, it was time for the novice mechanic in me to break out the spanners and get the new Vintage Speed stainless steel Bus Sport muffler fitted to my VW Split screen camper!

One of Dan’s top tips was to assemble and position everything loosely to ensure everything aligns nicely before finally tightening everything up. As the header adjustable flanges are different sizes/shapes, to make things clear in my head how it all fitted together, I did a test run fit up to make sure I knew which one went to which side. In my case, way better to be safe than sorry! I also took the opportunity to fix the exhaust studs in place prior to offering the exhaust system up in place. This way, everything was primed and ready to go, and I would not be applying exhaust assembly paste and then waiting ages before assembling the items!

fitting the second Vintage Speed adjustable flanges with Fibreglass fire sleeve to the engine
fitting the second Vintage Speed adjustable flanges with Fibreglass fire sleeve to the engine

So after I had done a trial test fit to establish what goes where, and working from the engine backwards, first up I applied some exhaust assembly paste to both sides of the smaller engine side gasket, put it in place and then attached the adjustable flanges with their fibreglass fire sleeves to both sides of the engine and then did the joints up finger tight ready for the next stage.

fitting the Vintage Speed adjustable flanges with Fibreglass fire sleeve to the engine
fitting the Vintage Speed adjustable flanges with Fibreglass fire sleeve to the engine

Next it was time to offer up and connect the main stainless steel muffler. Initially it was positioned loosely to align with the header flanges as well as fit over the rear heat exchanger connections. This is where having the ±4mm adjustable flanges really comes into their own, having a bit of extra ‘wiggle room’ is always useful!

once the fitted the Vintage Speed exhaust is aligned correctly, all fixings can be tightened up
once the fitted the Vintage Speed exhaust is aligned correctly, all fixings can be tightened up

With the muffler safely finger tight connected to the adjustable header flanges, it was time to go underneath and fix the heater box clamps into position to connect the muffler to the heat exchangers. With this done, and everything aligned correctly, it was time to go around and tighten up all the nuts/bolts to ensure everything was properly connected.

with the Vintage Speed exhaust fitted, time to refit the tin wear and new fresh air hoses
with the Vintage Speed exhaust fitted, time to refit the tin wear and new fresh air hoses

With the exhaust safely connected, I could then begin to re-assemble everything back into place again. Whilst the freshly painted rear valence was off, this was the perfect time to fit the new fresh air hoses from Machine 7. With the rear tin wear fitted and screwed back into place, the fresh air hose was fed through the opening in the tin wear from the top and connected to the heat exchangers below. A bit tricky in places with the odd angles involved, but it was quite helpful to use a screw driver to run around the inside of the fresh air hose end going to the heat exchangers to help widen the opening a little and guide it into place. You can clearly see why the fibreglass fire sleeve on the adjustable flanges is such a good idea with the proximity of the fresh air hose!

the re-painted rear valence with new rubber engine seal is fitted
the re-painted rear valence with new rubber engine seal is fitted

With the fresh air hose connected to the heat exchangers at the bottom, the top of the hose can then be cut to length with a sharp knife, and then push fit connected to the fan housing to complete the air cooled heating system ‘circuit’.

Before re-fitting the rear valance, the new rear valance rubber was fitted to complete the essential two separate air temperature zones that the VW air cooled relies on. Hot air below the tin wear, and cooler air above the tin wear in the engine compartment.

Air cooled engine cross section - The cooling system used on the most known air-cooled engine, the VW Beetle. Air is drawn into the ducting by the fan and passes through an oil-cooler before flowing over the cylinder heads and barrels. (see http://www.uniquecarsandparts.com.au/how_it_works_air_cooled_engine.htm)
Air cooled engine cross-section – The cooling system used on the most known air-cooled engine, the VW Beetle. Air is drawn into the ducting by the fan and passes through an oil-cooler before flowing over the cylinder heads and barrels. (see http://www.uniquecarsandparts.com.au/how_it_works_air_cooled_engine.htm)

Once the tin wear and seal were installed, it was job done and time for a cup of tea!

the Vintage Speed exhaust gives good ground clearance
the Vintage Speed exhaust gives good ground clearance

With the new Vintage Speed in place, it was time to start the engine and leave it running for a short while to fully cure the exhaust assembly paste…

the new Vintage Speed exhaust reminds me with of an old skool ‘zoom tube’ exhaust
the new Vintage Speed exhaust reminds me with of an old skool ‘zoom tube’ exhaust

…looks good, sounds great!

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