it’s been a fun 1,200+ mile road trip, Scotland and England, it’s been a blast!

On our journey back home, we managed to pick up a bit of a convoy with a couple of Early Bay window campers out and about on their travels! Always heartening to see other vintage VW’s on the road! 🙂

looks like we’ve got a little vintage VW convoy for company…

looks like we’ve got a little vintage VW convoy for company…

Glad we pushed on the extra hour last night, as the weather was indeed turning for the worse the further south we headed. Not normally how things work weather wise in the UK, and to compound it, the only element of the windscreen wiper mechanism that I didn’t get around to replacing or upgrading, decided to play up! There’s a lesson to be learned right there! Fortunately the wonders of RainX came to our rescue, amazing stuff!

As we had gained a bit of extra time, it was nice to be able to do another small surprise visit on a friend of mine who I hadn’t seen for quite a few years on our way home which was great, always nice to catch up in person!

1,200+ miles of fun and adventure on the road, the bus did good!

1,200+ miles of fun and adventure on the road, the bus did good!

Time to make the final push on home and head back to Hastings. All in all we’ve had a fantastic 1,200+ mile road trip which we’ve loved!

a pair of happy campers after a 1,200+ mile road trip to Scotland

a pair of happy campers after a 1,200+ mile road trip to Scotland

Roll on the next one…

meeting interesting characters and the rarest of buses on our road trip

Well after a good nights sleep, it was an early-ish start as we had to push on and get back home in the next couple of days. Fortunately our route home would take us near the Lake District and Yorkshire Dales National Parks, so not the worst scenery ahead for the first part of the drive! 🙂

beautiful early morning start at the Metal bridge Inn

beautiful early morning start at the Metal bridge Inn

So time to take off the campers BusEyes and get the night mode of the bus transformed into day travelling mode once again as we get set for today’s journey south. Always a good idea to check the oil in the morning before setting off. The engine had thus far done us proud and barely used any oil and ran like a proverbial sewing machine! 🙂 Big credit must go to the guys at Resto Classics for the way they help keep things ticking over on the bus so sweetly! Since their top end refresh and set-up, the engine has been running really smoothly and not missed a beat!

just checking the oil before setting off, all good to go!

just checking the oil before setting off, all good to go!

On the way down we decided to pull in at a services for a toilet break. Parked to the side of us was a cool and rather unusual looking bus with ‘Happy 40th Birthday’ banners on it. Always the curious types, we popped our heads in to congratulate the owners on their birthday celebrations, but we had a little surprise when we introduced ourselves…

unique 1976 Bedford JJL bus, the only one left in the world!

unique 1976 Bedford JJL bus, the only one left in the world!

The bus was a really rare Bedford JJL and it was the bus that was celebrating its 40th birthday, not the owners! Apparently they were just coming back from a show with it as it was the only remaining example from only four that were ever produced, and this being the first one that was ever made! The other 3 have long since gone to the great garage in the sky!

lovely couple showed us around their rare old bus

lovely couple showed us around their rare old bus

The owners were a lovely couple who took real pleasure in telling us all about the bus and its history. One of the fun things about our little road trip adventure is some of the unexpected people we have met on our travels – this was no exception 🙂

This prototype coach was built by Bedford Motor Company and fitted with Marshall B24F bodywork. Originally built (without running gear) for the 1976 London Motor Show and also later shown in the 1979 Glasgow Motor Show. The running gear was later added in November 1979. They were a lovely couple who clearly cherished the bus and enjoyed taking it to classic or vintage car shows. Great attention to detail, they even colour coordinated their attire to match the bus!

unique 1976 Bedford JJL bus, the only one left in the world!

unique 1976 Bedford JJL bus, the only one left in the world!

The Bedford JJL was an innovative (but ultimately unsuccessful) midibus model built by Bedford. The JJL could have been a success, but was ahead of its time in predicting the boom in the midibus market, as seen by the success of the Dennis Dart. HKX 553V was sold to Bournemouth Transport (trading as Yellow Buses) in 1983, and then onto The Goodman Group, where it saw service with Rambler and Goodman’s coaches. The ‘top trump’ facts for the bus are apparently…

  • 24’7″ long
  • 7″6′ wide
  • Carried 24 seated passengers, 5 standing
  • Transversely rear mounted Bedford 330 straight six diesel engine
  • Automatic gearbox Morse Hi Vo chain transfer box and spiral bevel angle box to inverted hypoid rear axle
  • Top speed, a heady 55mph (sounds familiar 😉 )
  • Cruising speed of 45/50mph

These little unexpected meetings can really make your day. Loved their enthusiasm and interest in keeping this bit of automotive heritage on the road, full credit and respect to them both!

the Peak District has a bleak wilderness type of beauty to it

the Peak District has a bleak wilderness type of beauty to it

Strangely as we headed further south, the weather began to change and became a bit overcast and rainy. Clearly we timed our trip to Scotland perfectly as we had great weather north of the border. Not sure about this dodgy English weather! Our route home took us back over the bleak beauty of the Peak District, clearly it’s not just us that appreciated the rugged beauty of the area!

our route home took us back over the bleak beauty of the Peak District

our route home took us back over the bleak beauty of the Peak District

As we were passing, seemed rude not to stop in on our new favourite Pub, the Snake Pass Inn and have our supper there! Initially we were planning on stopping over here again tonight after we had eaten, but having made good time on the roads today, we decided to push on a bit further and stop off a bit further south in a new to us Brit Stop location.

simple things are often the best – making dreams come true at Loch Lubnaig

After a fantastic day out at Jupiter Artland, we pushed on to find somewhere to stay for the night. We decided to head to the Loch Lomond and the Trossachs National Park region for the evening as we wanted to spend some time taking in some of Scotland’s natural gallery, that is its scenery and landscape.

not a bad view to be waking up to

not a bad view to be waking up to

Not a bad little view to wake up to in the morning, one that makes you want to get up and crack on with the day! So once we had said our good mornings to the four-legged neighbours, it was time to push on and find a nice little spot for breakfast, fortunately finding beauty spots to stop at in Scotland is not exactly hard, you could go so far as saying there is an abundance of them!

our early morning neighbour at Trossachs Mill

our early morning neighbour at Trossachs Mill

Stopping at the nearby Loch Lubnaig was a great example of such a beauty spot. It was here I had a little revelation. It’s often seen by some that travelling around in a vintage VW Split screen bus is ‘living the dream’ (whatever that’s supposed to mean?). We often joke about it thinking if only people knew the reality of vintage bus ownership and what driving them is like! 🙂 Never the less, the iconic camper conjures up this romantic notion within people, we’ve had so many people expressing this to us through the numerous waves or words on this trip already! Hence the dream/myth continues to grow…

a simple dream come true, tea on the banks of Loch Lubnaig

a simple dream come true, tea on the banks of Loch Lubnaig

However I realised that for me at least, this trip had fulfilled a very simple, but long-held dream of mine. One where you can go to beautiful areas of the country and make a little something to eat and drink whilst taking in the beauty of the surroundings. Nothing flash, expensive or complicated, but setting up the Trangia for making the tea in this idyllic location, made me realise just how lucky I was just to experience this moment. Hard to explain exactly, but it was a small dream come true for me! It was a lovely to take a little walk around the loch and chat about this an’ that with Lorna, sometimes it really is just the simple things in life that are the most memorable and magical!

the serene beauty of Loch Lubnaig

the serene beauty of Loch Lubnaig

We thought we’d push on to Crianlarich and stop for brunch at the Ben More Lodge as this was near the top of Loch Lomond and would make an ideal stopping point before driving down the length of the loch. Unfortunately we were now beginning the homeward section of the road trip, so would now need to start making our way back down the length of the country home again! Having looked at the map Lorna realised we could make a small detour and ‘pop in’ to see one of her old friends who we hadn’t seen for nearly 25 years or so!

great sounding IPA beer, but a bit too early in the day to be trying it!

great sounding IPA beer, but a bit too early in the day to be trying it!

Having checked she was in, we plotted a course to take us down the length of Loch Lomond and on to Kirkcudbright on the lower southwestern coast in the Dumfries and Galloway region of Scotland. It was a beautiful day, the scenery was stunning, why wouldn’t you want to go for a drive!

Tartan backed bar chairs at Ben More Lodge

Tartan backed bar chairs at Ben More Lodge

It was a beautiful drive down, and at some points we were literally chasing the end of the rainbow! It was great to catch up with Lornas friend Rachel again, and she very kindly treated us to some beautiful, locally caught fish and chips! With our bellies full, we decided to push on and cross the border before night fell, so as to reduce the driving over the next couple of days into manageable chunks.

chasing the end of the rainbow

chasing the end of the rainbow

On out way out over the border to England we passed through the last village in Scotland, Gretna Green, nationally famous for carrying out runaway weddings! Or in our families history, where my eldest brother ran away to get married so that the first thing my Mum and Dad knew about it was when they read about it in the local papers!

our Brit Stop for the night on the English side of the border

our Brit Stop for the night on the English side of the border

Well, after a long days driving, we arrived at out latest Brit Stop for the night on the English side of the border. Quite literally it will now be mostly down hill from here on in as we head home to the very lowest edge of England’s south coast as we make our way home…

the Scottish road trip goes full throttle to Jupiter and beyond!

Woke up to a beautiful sunny morning in Edinburgh, so far the Scottish weather has challenged the stereotype, it’s been great thus far for us! 🙂 One of the reasons we wanted to come to Scotland was to visit Jupiter Artland, a contemporary collection of artwork displayed in beautiful outdoor setting.

good morning from a sunny Edinburgh

good morning from a sunny Edinburgh

We wanted to spend a fair amount of time here, so decided to stay as near as possible rather than waste time travelling to it. As such, we grabbed a last-minute deal on booking.com and had a bit of hotel ‘luxury’ for our night in Edinburgh, well by luxury, I mean a toilet and shower!

always a sucker for a vintage ‘Clipper’ Airstream caravan

always a sucker for a vintage ‘Clipper’ Airstream caravan

It was worth making the early start and not spending time on the road to get here. We grabbed a coffee and a snack to keep us going (could not resist trying out the vintage Airstream Cafe out!) before the place got too busy!

nailed it – door sculpture at Jupiter Artland cafe

nailed it – door sculpture at Jupiter Artland cafe

Easy to see why this was shortlisted as museum of the year 2016, so much to see and all set in magnificent grounds and woodlands!

Life Mounds terraced earthworks by Charles Jencks

Life Mounds terraced earthworks by Charles Jencks

In fact some of the pieces such as ‘Life Mounds’ by Charles Jencks were the landscape!

Life Mounds terraced earthworks by Charles Jencks

Life Mounds terraced earthworks by Charles Jencks

Plenty of art inspired Architectural details to be seen on display…

cool design for the tin roof gallery

cool design for the tin roof gallery

…plus lots of hidden away art awaiting to be discovered, forget Pokémon GO, this is far more captivating searching out and finding hidden art treasures around the grounds!

a Forest – tessellated colourful reflective chrome panels by Jim Lambie

a Forest – tessellated colourful reflective chrome panels by Jim Lambie

Good job the tour comes with a map so you can explore at your own pace

‘only collect’ – Lorna on top of Ian Hamiltons Northumbrian limestone arched bridge

‘only collect’ – Lorna on top of Ian Hamilton’s Northumbrian limestone arched bridge

We both loved the five Weeping Girls by Laura Wood…

Weeping Girls by Laura Wood

Weeping Girls by Laura Wood

haunting…

Weeping Girls by Laura Wood

Weeping Girls by Laura Wood

provocative…

Weeping Girls by Laura Wood

Weeping Girls by Laura Wood

and utterly captivating – loved them!

Landscape with gun and tree by Cornella Parker

Landscape with gun and tree by Cornella Parker

Artwork of various scales…

over here – 4m circular web knitted by Shane Waltener

over here – 4m circular web knitted by Shane Waltener

all with differing levels of intricate details!

over here – 4m circular web knitted by Shane Waltener

over here – 4m circular web knitted by Shane Waltener

We also really loved this piece called ‘Animitas’ by the renowned French artist Christian Boltanski. The work is comprised of hundreds of small Japanese bells attached to long stems planted in the ground. The bells chiming to the wind let out the ‘music of the souls’. Each bell will be placed on the island within the Duck Pond to reproduce the map of the stars on the night the artist was born, 6th September 1944.

There was loads more to see and do (more images are posted on my instagram or Lornas instagram accounts if you want to have a look or follow…), but all in all we had a fantastic time at Jupiter Artland – highly recommended place to visit!

old skool technology, heritage, cashmere wool and an awesome Mississippi mud pie!

Apparently this trip is not all about me! After last nights bar room sing along, much to Lornas delight, we found out that Hawick is famous for Cashmere wool and knitting! So after a full Scottish breakfast with some Haggis, we headed off to explore the town and find the knitting heritage museum and visitor centre of the world-famous family set-up business Johnstons of Elgin (since 1797).

hands up if you like Cashmere

hands up if you like Cashmere

Some amazing looking proper old skool technology on display, and I could not believe just how soft the Cashmere wool felt to the touch, amazing stuff! As Lorna is about to embark on an MA in Textiles this September at the Royal College of Art in London, she really enjoyed seeing the industrial history and production processes on display.

old skool technology – a 250 year old hand frame loom

old skool technology – a 250-year-old hand frame loom

Having spent time exploring the knitting heritage centres and museums, we grabbed a lovely lunch at the Damascus Drum Cafe in the centre of town. A great little independent cafe/bookshop tucked away off the high street serving good coffee/tea and fair trade/home produced food… plus an awesome Mississippi mud pie! 🙂

route planning with an awesome Mississippi mud pie at the Damascus Drum cafe

route planning with an awesome Mississippi mud pie at the Damascus Drum cafe

Nice to have a relaxing/non-driving time mooching around Hawick, taking in a bit of history, heritage and culture, but after a great lunch in the Damascus Drum Cafe, it was time to hit the road again as we wanted to push on and head on up to Edinburgh tonight as we had a special place we wanted to spend some time at tomorrow…

the Snake Pass to Scotland, todays going to be a driving day

Good nights sleep at our first Brit Stop, and in the mood for a full English breakfast at Snake Pass Inn to start the day off right! Before heading off on todays journey, there was a little niggle that needed sorting on the bus first…

Snake Pass Inn breakfast of champions to start the day off right!

Snake Pass Inn breakfast of champions to start the day off right!

The cigarette lighter socket was playing up, but fortunately I had a cunning plan and managed to rig up a ‘temporary’ workaround solution – happy days! Easy to forget the importance of the humble 12v cigarette lighter socket! At least I would be able to keep the iPhone charged as I use it with the TomTom app as my sat nav system!

good start to the day, driving over the Snake Pass…

good start to the day, driving over the Snake Pass…

Overcast start to the day, but nonetheless, great to continue the drive along the A57 Snake Pass as it winds across the Peak District and crosses the Pennines as we head onwards and upwards… today will mostly be a driving day as we head towards Scotland!

The map shows our approx. route as we tried to avoid motorways when possible so we could get to see as much of the country as possible, plus at a steady 55mph its a much better journey off the motorway. It’s amazing just how much the countryside and scenery changes as you travel around the UK, it’s easy to forget just how beautiful the country is! Today is pretty going to be a driving day as our plan is to make it across the border into Scotland and stay at Hawick tonight…

Well we finally arrived at Hawick (pronounced locally as ‘Hoick’ apparently?) and set the camper up at our latest Brit Stop of the Horse and Hound Country Inn in Bonchester Bridge. After grabbing something to eat, we heard singing coming from the hotel public bar. Curiosity got the better of us, so we wandered though and stumbled into a spontaneous folk/country music singing session with a local musician and a selection of guests and villagers joining in singing various Don McLean, Johnny Cash, Kenny Rogers and Simon and Garfunkel standards. We managed to take part in a unique version of the Boxer by Simon & Garfunkel like you’ve never heard it before… with kitchen trays for the impact on the chorus – you had to be there! Looks like our time in Scotland should be fun! 🙂

from the un-stately home to driving the Snake Pass, the vdubxs road trip adventure continues…

After a good nights sleep and a nice breakfast at my sisters in Clipston, she suggested we might like to visit the quirky National Trust property affectionately known as the ‘un-stately’ home and country estate of Calke Abbey in Derbyshire. Anything quirky gets our interest, so with a new destination to explore, we said our farewells and hit the road again.

The various buildings of the Abbey are set in the ancient and fragile habitats of Calke Park, a designated National Nature Reserve with a variety of wildlife roaming around as you drive through the grounds. Scattered around were some magnificent ancient trees, some of the oldest in Europe apparently, with one called ‘Old Man of Calke’ thought to be over 1,000 years old! That said, weirdly I loved the one behind where we parked that looked like it had been struck by lightning!

couldn’t wish for a better day to visit Calke Abbey, the un-stately home!

couldn’t wish for a better day to visit Calke Abbey, the un-stately home!

I’m not really into touristy type pictures, but if you like my take on some of the interesting little found details around the Calke Abbey. Lorna and I took a range of photos and videos that are used below and covering the road trip, so if you want to see more, then please check our social media feeds… feel free to like/follow and enjoy! 🙂

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waste not want not vintage kitchen signage

waste not want not vintage kitchen signage

The ethos of the National Trusts work at Calke Abbey has been to sensitively repair and not overly restore the house to ensure its unique character is kept. It makes it such an interesting and intriguing place to visit. The Palladian architecture and grand, opulent interiors sat juxtaposed with simple everyday objects of different eras, bringing a sense of a living experience of the house as it was.

mirror mirror on the wall…

mirror mirror on the wall…

Sparse corridors linking rooms together often increased the element of surprise when entering the different contrasting rooms of the main building.

un-stately home, sympathetically repaired, not over restored

un-stately home, sympathetically repaired, not over restored

Beautiful distressed detail to be found everywhere in the house.

beautiful patina, sympathetically repaired, not over restored

beautiful patina, sympathetically repaired, not over restored

Small side rooms contained simple utility items found within the building as part of its careful renovation and were left to help bring life and insight to the building’s history.

fantastic array of vintage oil lights

fantastic array of vintage oil lights

Loved this innovative shower design, it would make a change from ‘washing’ with baby wipes on the road!

love this shower design

love this shower design

Before the days of MP3’s, 6″ singles kids, try getting this on your streaming service!

before the days of mp3’s, the vintage 45 rpm 6" single

before the days of mp3’s, the vintage 45 rpm 6″ single

Lorna loves books so the collection of vintage books in the library was her idea of heaven!

beautiful vintage books in the Calke Abbey library

beautiful vintage books in the Calke Abbey library

We had a fantastic day at Calke Abbey, loads to see and do for all the family, but after a good wander round, it was time to push on further north and find a place to stay for the night. Having consulted our Brit Stops directory, I wanted to take Lorna for a drive through the beautiful Peak District National Park along the famous Snake Pass on the A57.

I knew the Snake Pass from our early days of living in Leicester, and numerous trips to Glossop to collect VW panels from Alan Schofields for various vintage VW buses over the years! It’s a beautiful mountain pass to drive at an elevation of 1,680 feet (510 m) above sea level, located between Manchester and Sheffield in the scenic Peak District National Park. The road was engineered by Thomas Telford and opened in 1821.

from river and forest pass to bleak moorland hills, the Snake Pass is a great drive

from river and forest pass to bleak moorland hills, the Snake Pass is a great drive

The road twists, turns, rises and falls through stunning scenery and ever-changing backdrops of the peak districts beauty. Passing the vast expanse of Ladybower Reservoir, the tall shaded forest pass or the bleak moorland landscape. We had a great drive out to our final destination for the day, the Snake Pass Inn.We planned to stop over here for the night after todays stage of our road trip.

Snake Pass Inn award winning steak and ale pie

Snake Pass Inn award-winning steak and ale pie

Once set up for the night, we finished the day off with an award-winning Steak and Ale Pie and Chilli, plus a pint of ‘Moonshine’ ale to wash things down – a perfect end to the day!

Snake Pass Inn chilli and salad

Snake Pass Inn chilli and salad

Looks like we should sleep well tonight! That said, there are a couple of little niggles I need to look at on the bus first thing in the morning…

no trailer Queen… time for a Road Trip to Scotland!

Sometimes its all a bit too easy for me to get sidetracked into trying to perfect my vision for how I want the camper to end up being, but this can be at the expense of simply using it as is and just enjoying it! Well not today, today the bus is packed, the sun is shining and the plan is to hit the road and head north to Scotland!

ready or not, its time to go…

ready or not, its time to go…

The Canterbury Pitt cooker unit is not yet finished, but for once, this will not be an excuse for not going! This time we’re taking my trusted 30-year-old Trangia cooker for roadside hot drinks and food. Although we would need to do a slight detour to Morden in South London to collect a missing part that I managed to source on eBay!

No Trailer Queen #GetOutAndDrive vintage camper bumper sticker

No Trailer Queen #GetOutAndDrive vintage camper bumper sticker

As it was a very much spur of the minute road trip, we were planning to make things up as we went along. Some clothes, sleeping bags and various bits were chucked in the back, if we missed anything, we would pick it up on the go. We were planning to use various Britstop locations for our nightly stop overs, and work our route out on the fly to take in various locations as we headed north to Scotland…

be prepared – Brit Stops directory and wellies

be prepared – Brit Stops directory and wellies

In that spirit of making things up as we went along, Lorna remembered a charity she wanted to visit which was nearish to our general route so we then went to visit WorkAid. They are set up to tackle poverty by providing disadvantaged people with the tools they need to learn a skilled trade and earn a living. Since 1986, WorkAid has helped around 100,000 disadvantaged people to break the cycle of poverty and build better lives for themselves and their families. A very cool project to support or help! 🙂

After our early detours, we were then planning to push on and find a Britstop location in the Midlands to stay over at. We used to live up here in Leicester, and my older sister still does, and having not seen her for a good few years, we decided to drop by with a surprise visit to say hello. So we headed off to the picturesque village of Clipston hoping to see if they were in or not… fortunately, happy days, both my sister and husband were in! 🙂

It was really great to catch up! Since we had last caught up, my sister had been very busy tracing our family history. Fascinating to find out that our Grandfathers Uncle was John Thornton Down VC and he had won the Victoria Cross down in New Zealand in 1863! Also turned out that we had quite a lot of family history from Australia as well! I’m going to try to help her put the information together in some form of graphical/digital format in the future so we can have a record of the family history.

Before we knew it, one thing lead to another and before we knew it we were having supper and had the offer of beds for the night! Life on the road had started rather comfortably on our first day, we could get used to this!

another marvel from Buttys Bits vintage VW emporium

One of my (many) little OCD hangups is being able to see out the windscreen clearly when driving along. And although I’ve upgraded the wiper blades to the best options Volkswagen did for Split screen buses at the time, they are not the best things in the world for keeping the glass clean!

seen worse views…

seen worse views…

Another annoyance that most split bus drivers might empathise with is the inability of the wipers to ‘self park’ when switched off! They just sort of stop wherever they are, so you (or is it just me?) end up playing the game of trying to time switching them off so that they finish as near as possible to the park position to the side of the screen. A great game for all the family, hours of fun for everyone as I’m sure you can imagine! 😉

innovative quality engineering solutions from Buttys Bits

innovative quality engineering solutions from Buttys Bits

Well fortunately it’s not just me that gets bugged by this ‘feature’, luckily the super talented engineer Simon Butland of Buttys Bits had spotted the issue and used his skills to develop some fantastic upgrades to help resolve some of the issues!

quality twin speed 12v wiper motor from Buttys Bits

quality twin speed 12v wiper motor from Buttys Bits

Not only has he developed a 12v twin speed self park wiper motor that fits a vintage VW Split screen camper (yeah modern motorists won’t get how good an upgrade this is as its standard on modern cars!)…

old wiper linkage arm – this should be straight!

old wiper linkage arm – this should be straight!

…but has also produced a new and improved wiper linkage arm with ball joint ends to replace worn or damaged parts!

Buttys Bits replacement wiper linkage rod

Buttys Bits replacement wiper linkage rod

Cool stuff! 🙂 The replacement right hand rod has balljoints joints and is pre-setup at the correct length so no need to alter/guess the correct lengths etc. The rods will fit onto the original wiper spindle ball and the drive unit on the original drive plate.

Buttys Bits replacement wiper linkage rod ends

Buttys Bits replacement wiper linkage rod ends

So with the new twin speed/self park motor fitted, along with a replacement wiper linkage rod, it was time to address my poor old worn wiper shafts. Fair to say that they have seen a fair bit of action over their lifetime, they were noisy, worn and had seen better days!

the old wiper shafts had served their time and now seen better days

the old wiper shafts had served their time and now seen better days

I had ordered a pair of replacement Wolfsburg West wiper shafts and spindle caps from Alan Schofields to complete the transformation.

new Wolfsburg West wiper shafts and spindle caps

new Wolfsburg West wiper shafts and spindle caps

Once fitted and the wiper blades realigned, the difference was remarkable – the whole operation is just so much quieter than before. I guess I had simply grown accustomed to the noise of the mechanical grinding and whirring of the old mechanism and linkages!

new wiper shaft and spindle caps fitted

new wiper shaft and spindle caps fitted

Typical, I do a job that won’t fully be appreciated to the winter months, but at least it’s now done! Less work and more time to spend actually getting out and enjoying the camper whilst the sun’s out!

must be a family thing – a Westfalia LT28 Sven Hedin camper

Looks like the camper van bug is not just something that’s isolated to me – my brother obviously had similar influences to me growing up at home, as can be seen in one of my Dads late bay window Westfalia pop top camper (he’s pictured top right)…

memory making times in our VW Westfalia camper

memory making times in our VW Westfalia camper

So finally my brother and his wife have taken the plunge and bought themselves a Westfalia LT28 Sven Hedin camper or ‘00Sven’ as they have christened him! Not so much room on the Isle of Man to go exploring, but I’m pretty sure they’ll catching the ferry and travelling further afield in it pretty soon!

Westfalia LT28 Sven Hedin

Westfalia LT28 Sven Hedin

All a bit modern compared to my bus, but my wife was impressed that it had a kitchen, shower, hot water system and loads of storage too!

LT28 Sven Hedin interior design

LT28 Sven Hedin interior design

So includes a kitchen and living room, really living in style!

Sven Hedin Westfalia layout configuration options

Sven Hedin Westfalia layout configuration options

Loving the retro graphics and imagery/colours of the period sales brochure – 1985-00 Sven Hedin Westfalia brochure

Sven Hedin Westfalia brochure

Sven Hedin Westfalia brochure